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The Foreign Exchange - Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey



Nicolay - City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto
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City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto

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The Foreign Exchange - Love In Flying Colors
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Love In Flying Colors

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Zo! - ManMade
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ManMade

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+FE Music: The Reworks

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in: News · August 21, 2015 at 2:00 PM ·

Where to find Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey on CD

Where to find Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey on CD
We have compiled a list of record stores that have the CD version of Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey in stock. This list will be frequently updated as more stores are confirmed and will soon include information on stores outside of the United States also. If your city or state is not included or if you are experiencing problems locating a copy in your area, please leave a comment and we will try to assist you!
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in: Releases · August 3, 2015 at 9:00 AM · Comments

The Foreign Exchange - Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey

The Foreign Exchange - Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey
The new album from Grammy Nominated duo The Foreign Exchange is out now on +FE Music.
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Exclaim! reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

in: Reviews · August 25, 2015 at 5:31 PM · Comments
Exclaim! reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'
Every Foreign Exchange album is a departure, an abrupt turn from what you've come to expect that takes a minute to grow on you. Tales from the Land of Milk and Honey, the group's fifth album since emerging in 2004, is as delectable as it sounds, and this time around, rather than requiring the usual marination period, this one can cook immediately.

Continue reading Exclaim! reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

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SoulTracks reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

in: Reviews · August 24, 2015 at 7:59 AM · Comments
SoulTracks reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'
After a bated breath wait since the release of 2013's Love in Flying Colors, the sixth full-length album from the Grammy-nominated artist collective known as The Foreign Exchange (+FE) has finally been released to the world to put global fans at ease. Much of the sound palettes used on Tales from the Land of Milk and Honey will be familiar to followers who've been around since 2004's Connected. However, less prominent are the prevailing sense of melancholia and blues contemplation that threaded previous releases like Authenticity and even a good chunk of Love in Flying Colors. Instead, multi-instrumentalist producer and composer, Nicolay, and hip hop impresario cum R&B singer, Phonte Coleman (aka Phonte aka Phontigallo), along with singers Carmen Rodgers, Tamisha Waden, and Shana Tucker all throw open the drapes, roll up the rug, cover the lamps, and pump up the funk 'n' bass in what can be considered their first party album since their vivacious +FE: The Reworks project. A sprinkling of soul pop ballads with a hint of the band's thinking man's soul nicely round out a return that largely satisfies.

Following such recent biting hits as "Better," on Tales from the Land of Milk and Honey the bitterness has healed and the cynicism that characterized some of the band's dark musical humor has yielded to brighter tones, groovier rhythms, and plenty of fun -- though rather than coming from Phonte's pen and impeccable comedic timing, that spiritedness comes more from the music on boogie-woogie disco cuts like "Work It To The Top" and percussive ballroom grooves like "Body." Lyrically, there's more grace present on ballads like "Truce" and the introspection tends to point the finger inward rather than outward on "Face in the Reflection." Even an interlude like the synthy piano ballad of "Sevenths and Ninths" is the sweetest of love letters. These are welcome shadings to the band's catalog, expanding the kaleidoscope of human expressions +FE comments on and explores.

Continue reading SoulTracks reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

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The Foreign Exchange introduces its own Song of Solomon: 'Tales From the Land of Milk and Honey' (via Washington Post)

in: Interviews · August 22, 2015 at 8:52 PM · Comments
The Foreign Exchange introduces its own Song of Solomon: 'Tales From the Land of Milk and Honey' (via Washington Post)
Phonte Coleman, the rapping, singing half of the hip-hop/R&B duo the Foreign Exchange, has a complicated relationship with religion.

When he was growing up, he detested the mandatory trips to his grandmother's baptist church, so he joined the choir just to make the ordeal more palatable. At least from the choir stand there was an added element of entertainment. Stationed behind the preacher, young Phonte could gaze upon the flock and see who was fanning themselves, who was trying not to fall asleep and who was struggling to stay on beat.

"For me it was very much a training ground in some ways," Phonte said. "I honestly wish I would have took it more seriously at that time. A lot of my singing and vocal arrangements, it was really just self-taught in a lot of ways. Had I been paying more attention in choir practice and not just f--ing around ... I'm sure I missed out on a lot of crucial lessons that would have served me better in the end."

Now that he's an adult, Phonte still doesn't care much for church. He'll go -- reluctantly. But he also admits that maybe he's missing something.

Continue reading The Foreign Exchange introduces its own Song of Solomon: 'Tales From the Land of Milk and Honey' (via Washington Post)

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Pitchfork reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

in: Reviews · August 20, 2015 at 8:29 AM · Comments
Pitchfork reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'
If you are curious about Phonte and Nicolay's mindset going into their fifth studio album as the Foreign Exchange, just look at their social media accounts. Phonte, the group's affable frontman, feeds his Twitter stream with acerbic real talk and hot-take movie reviews. On Facebook, producer Nicolay posts videos of bobblehead dolls in his studio, and jokes about his paltry royalty checks from streaming services. After 11 years together, and several albums of grown folks' soul, it seems the two aren't taking themselves too seriously. They're having fun and don't mind bringing you into the fold.

Tales from the Land of Milk and Honey is a delightful collection of sophisticated R&B and electronic dance, tied directly to the era of Morris Day funk grooves and Teddy Riley's New Jack Swing. As it plays, Phonte, Nicolay, keyboardist Zo!, and vocalists Carmen Rodgers and Tamisha Waden recall the storied Minneapolis funk sound while staying true to their own established blend of Eurocentric electro-soul. In a way, Milk and Honey feels like a concept record: The press photos resemble a parody of Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, and the title track evokes Sergio Mendes' brand of airy Brazilian jazz. The lyrics pull from Stevie Wonder's songbook of imagined utopias and peaceful horizons. Then suddenly, on "Work It to the Top", Phonte sings in a nasal tone that channels groups like Ready for the World and Cameo over a vintage, computerized-R&B stomp.

Continue reading Pitchfork reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

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AllMusic reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'

in: Reviews · August 17, 2015 at 7:15 PM · Comments
AllMusic reviews 'Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey'
Only two months after Nicolay issued his collaborative City Lights, Vol. 3: Soweto, the producer and instrumentalist, along with singing, songwriting, and arranging partner Phonte, returned with the most varied Foreign Exchange album. It's also the one that most emphasizes the duo's extended family of collaborators. The cover of this, their fifth proper full-length, displays Carmen Rodgers and Tamisha Waden -- two of their co-lead and background vocalists -- as well as Lorenzo "Zo!" Ferguson. The FE nucleus and Zo! go way back and take it to another level here, with Zo! -- similar to Nicolay, a studio wiz who typically works in isolation -- a co-songwriter and co-producer of every song. Perhaps proximity and a history as performing partners partly explain why so much of this sounds like a party, as free and easy as the group's shows. FE previously went house with "So What If It Is," a deep and cleansing track, but when they return to the form here, it's with the humorous and rhythmically tougher early-'90s throwback "Asking for a Friend," where Phonte affects a distinguished Englishman accent akin to that of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air's Geoffrey Butler. On first listen, the song sounds merely like an amusing novelty until the stellar Waden-led chorus enters and takes it somewhere else. (No R&B group before them has maintained such a strong balance between female and male voices.) A different stunt is pulled with "Work It to the Top," bumping boogie that touches on 1979-1981 Slave -- just a little bit -- down to Phonte's spirited Steve Arrington mannerisms. Beyond those two songs and the pair of delighted Brazilian fusion-styled title tracks that begin and end the album, what remains largely refines the sweet and blissful grooves of Love in Flying Colors. That's not a bad thing, not when the writing is as sharp, with rich harmonies laced through rhythms that bound and wind with unforced finesse and warmth. Even with a disarming ballad on each side, Tales from the Land of Milk and Honey is one of the funnest R&B albums in some time.
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The Foreign Exchange - Asking For A Friend / On A Day Like Today (Re-Edit)

in: Releases · August 3, 2015 at 9:44 AM · Comments
The Foreign Exchange - Asking For A Friend / On A Day Like Today (Re-Edit)
"Asking For A Friend" is the first single taken from The Foreign Exchange's upcoming album, Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey. The full single bundle is available for purchase on iTunes and Amazon and available for streaming on SoundCloud and Spotify now and includes "Asking For A Friend" as well as non-album B-Side "On A Day Like Today (Re-Edit)". Tales From The Land Of Milk And Honey drops 8/21/15 on +FE Music and is available for pre-order now.

"THE FOREIGN EXCHANGE - ASKING FOR A FRIEND / ON A DAY LIKE TODAY (RE-EDIT)" LISTEN

"Asking For A Friend" (P. Coleman, M. Rook, L. Ferguson, C. Rodgers)

Lead vocals: Phonte
Background vocals: Tamisha Waden, Carmen Rodgers, Phonte, Pirahnahead, and Diviniti
All instruments: Nicolay and Zo!

Produced by Phonte and Nicolay for The Foreign Exchange Music, LLC and Zo! for Chapter 3hree, Verse 5ive Music, LLC

"On A Day Like Today (Re-Edit)" (P. Coleman, M. Rook)

Lead vocals: Phonte
Background vocals: Phonte and Shana Tucker
All instruments: Nicolay

Produced by Phonte and Nicolay for The Foreign Exchange Music, LLC
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The Foreign Exchange - Asking For A Friend (Official Video)

in: Media » Video · August 2, 2015 at 12:14 PM · Comments
The Foreign Exchange - Asking For A Friend (Official Video)
+FE Music proudly presents the official music video for Asking For A Friend, directed by Kenneth Price.

Watch this video

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SoulBounce reviews City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto

in: Reviews · July 19, 2015 at 1:54 PM · Comments
There is something about the sights and sounds of South Africa that acts as a muse for artists, from the Graceland album by Paul Simon to the latest work by Idris Elba. The impact of South African culture was no different for Nicolay, of the SoulBounce-certified collective The Foreign Exchange, who used it as the creative spark for his latest solo project, City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto. As with City Lights Vol. 2: Shibuya, which contains his musical reflections on Tokyo, Soweto is Nicolay's vessel to articulate the richness of his South African experience. While some people show you travel photos after their journeys, Nicolay shares stories with beautiful instrumentals.

City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto is grounded in a combination of soulful house and electronic sounds, along with Nicolay's distinctive interpretation of South African percussive sounds. The album fluctuates between a vibrant house music experience to much more subdued mid- to downtempo cuts that at certain points almost take on ambient vibes. The more vibrant side is found on tracks like "Tomorrow," "It's in the Way You Smile" and the sonically fluid and rich "Day Dreams," which is reminiscent of the music of Roy Ayers.

Continue reading SoulBounce reviews City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto

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IndyWeek reviews City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto

in: Reviews · July 11, 2015 at 9:11 AM · Comments
The City Lights series, by The Foreign Exchange producer Nicolay, transforms his travels into obliquely personal instrumentals. The albums are about a place's effect on him, not some cheap cherry-picking of ethnic sounds set to a beat. Nicolay's background is rooted in a complex cultural give-and-take, so these are transmissions from someone who grew up in the Netherlands but loves American funk, soul, house and hip-hop, living in North Carolina and making music about South Africa. Global house music is often tasteful, but rarely this mindful.

Continue reading IndyWeek reviews City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto

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The Foreign Exchange's Nicolay tours to find new inspiration (via IndyWeek)

in: Interviews · July 11, 2015 at 8:38 AM · Comments
Phonte Coleman and Matthijs "Nicolay" Rook keep their distance.

Together, they've made several albums, toured the world, been nominated for a Grammy and built a little independent empire under the name The Foreign Exchange. But Coleman raps and sings from Raleigh, while the Dutch-born Nicolay lives in Wilmington. The space between them must be fertile, as they both pursue separate artistic offshoots. Coleman has his hip-hop and TV endeavors, while Nicolay has just released his expansive fourth solo album, City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto, in which he offers up a Euro-soul take on South Africa's native rhythms.

After The Foreign Exchange's May 2014 performance in Johannesburg, the group left the city by way of the colorful Nelson Mandela Bridge, pictured on Soweto's cover. The city's bridge, house music, people, Zulu language and the unexpected pandemonium surrounding their performance there inspired Nicolay when he sat down to make the first City Lights set in six years.

From Wilmington, Nicolay spoke about the thought process behind the record and how he hopes to avoid the pitfalls of Prince and Paul McCartney.

Continue reading The Foreign Exchange's Nicolay tours to find new inspiration (via IndyWeek)

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We Be Spirits interviews Nicolay

in: Interviews · July 4, 2015 at 5:54 PM · Comments
Nicolay is one of the most eclectic and innovative music producers around, full stop. His first notable achievement as producer came in 2004 after Connected was released - the debut album of The Foreign Exchange, of which he is half. The album was famously recorded with the "exchange" of electronic files across the Atlantic; the artists meeting only after it had been finished. He has since gone on to cover new and exciting musical ground releasing albums as a solo artist, as well as part of TFE.

Just as comfortable in a studio setting as in live performance, this gifted Dutch musician, who now resides in North Carolina, recently spoke openly to me about topics such as how both Prince and Thundercat inspire him, the special working relationship he shares with Phonte (his partner in The Foreign Exchange), his opinion on the current wave of African electronic music, and how he views spirituality in terms of his creativity. Read on and be enlightened.

Continue reading We Be Spirits interviews Nicolay

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Textura reviews 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto'

in: Reviews · June 29, 2015 at 8:37 AM · Comments
Nicolay has traveled a long way, both literally and figuratively, since the days he went by the name Matthijs Rook in his Utrecht, Netherlands homeland. Not all that many years ago, he was issuing hip-hop jams on a release such as Here (BBE, 2006), but over time his music has undergone a substantial metamorphosis, as exemplified by the albums he's released with Phonte under The Foreign Exchange name and perhaps even more dramatically the Nujazz-styled albums he's issued in the City Lights series. Six years ago, the second installment, City Lights, Vol. 2: Shibuya, distilled into musical form the visceral thrill associated with a visit to Tokyo, and now this latest volume does much the same whilst displacing the geographical focus to South Africa.

Continue reading Textura reviews 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto'

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More recent entries
IndyWeek reviews City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto in: Reviews
The Foreign Exchange's Nicolay tours to find new inspiration (via IndyWeek) in: Interviews
We Be Spirits interviews Nicolay in: Interviews
Textura reviews 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto' in: Reviews
Songs We Love: Nicolay, 'The Brightest Star' (via NPR) in: Reviews
Nicolay Shares A Track-By-Track Breakdown Of His New Album 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto' in: Blogs
Nicolay wraps his experiences abroad into a jazzy album (via Star-News) in: Interviews
Nicolay - The Secret in: Music
Pitchfork reviews 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto' in: Reviews
AllMusic reviews 'City Lights Vol. 3: Soweto' in: Reviews

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